Serving with City Year is a unique experience that will challenge and inspire you throughout your time in Boston. You will forge unforgettable relationships with students, make lifelong friendships with teammates, and acquire skills that will serve you long after you hang up your red jacket. Get inspired to start your City Year!

Hear from Students and Schools

Spotlight on Alumni

Stories from Service


Hear from Students and Schools

There are few resources more valuable to a school than committed, well-trained, focused corps members. City Year corps members often develop strong relationships with students, which deepens each student's connection to school and motivates them to achieve.
Principal Chisholm, Condon K-7 School

 

City Year AmeriCorps members form beautiful bonds and powerful connections with our students and we see that every day... [And] when City Year alums show up a year later, they get swarmed like superstars. They are mobbed with high fives, hugs, and ear to ear smiles...City Year is our spirit. They are our rock. They're our spark at our school. They inspire, they eradicate gaps, and they help to build bridges throughout our school...City Year is a driver of justice and they’re truly making better happen in our school community and schools across the city.

Principal Andrew Rollins, Mildred Avenue K-8 School

Spotlight on Alumni

  • Curran Raclin
    • Served: City Year Boston 2005-2006
    • Current position: Director of CRM & Data Strategy at The Madison Square Garden Company
    • Fun Fact: Curran's former student Daavi became a corps member himself. They were reunited onstage at City Year Boston's annual gala in 2016.
  • Rahn Dorsey
    • Served: City Year Boston 1989-1990
    • Current position: Chief of Education, City of Boston

Stories from Service

  • What is a City Year? 
    When people ask Eleanore Maclean, “What is City Year?” she finds it a deceptively hard question to answer. Measured in time, it’s 10 months completing 1,700 hours of service. But digging deeper, her students, teachers, and teammates all offer different definitions. And they all point to one thing: growth.
     
  • Go With the Flow: 5 Pieces of Advice from a Current Corps Member
    What is one of the most important things Alana Friedman has learned this year? Be like water; go with the flow! In service, you’ll be thrown into situations you couldn’t have anticipated. Smile, be flexible, and do your best. She offers this and four more tips for having a successful City Year.
     
  • Playing to a Student's Strengths
    William is Zach Davidson's pencil-tapping, hip-shaking, fast-talking student. He is often chattering when he should be working, which negatively impacts his test scores. But after William taught Zach his "patented" free-throw technique at recess, a light bulb went off. Instead of quelling William's energy, Zach could channel it into helping his fellow classmates with reading.