2014-11-18

This past Thursday, City Year headquarters hosted Boston’s Mayor Marty Walsh, Boston Public School Superintendent John McDonough, and many others for the release of a new report, “Opportunity and Equity.”

The report was commissioned by City Year Trustee and Former Boston Public Schools Superintendent Dr. Carol Johnson in order to examine the root causes of and potential solutions to the achievement gap for Black and Latino boys in Boston. At City Year we know this gap persists in Boston and other large cities across the nation. The report highlights measures that can help provide all students with the “access, opportunities, and supports necessary to ensure the experience of challenging coursework, academic success and preparation for college and career.” 

Following the release of the report, members of the community took part in a panel discussion on President Obama’s My Brother’s Keeper initiative to help close opportunity gaps for young men of color. The initiative calls for communities, organizations, and individuals to help these young men receive the support, mentoring, and education they need to succeed from cradle to college and career.
 

Since My Brother’s Keeper began, City Year has established its own task force to take a close look at how our service in urban public schools is supporting Black, Latino and Native American boys, and how we can invest more resources into increasing the success of these young men. City Year’s task force is made up of staff from three different City Year departments: National Policy, Recruitment, and School Programs. 

City Year’s Jeff Joseph is one of our task force leaders, and wrote the first of a three-part blog series on My Brother’s Keeper.

 

City Year headquarters hosted Boston’s Mayor Marty Walsh, Boston Public School Superintendent John McDonough, and many others for the release of a new report, “Opportunity and Equity.” The report was commissioned by City Year Trustee and Former Boston Public Schools Superintendent Dr. Carol Johnson to examine the achievement gap for Black and Latino boys in Boston.

Share This Page